Abe Lincoln, the Greatest Slaver of them all

(This may be the single most unpopular thing I’ve ever comitted to words. That doesn’t make it wrong, though.)

America has had a few really good Presidents, but for some reason the ones most beloved by the public seem to be the very worst of the bunch.

To wit, Abraham Lincoln, the Great Liberator and the Savior of the Nation.

As the bicentennial of Lincoln’s birth approaches, the next year will occasion much overwrought analysis and ridiculous P.C. attempts to retcon Lincoln into the sugar-pillow diversity of the modern times. This oncoming wave of pseudo-intellectual refuse deserves to be rejected out of hand, for the measure of a man must be taken in the context of the times in which he lived.

Nonetheless, Abraham Lincoln was a monster, and rather than saving the nation he singlehandedly inflicted grave injury to the body and soul of the United States of America.

Regardless of what one thinks about slavery – which Lincoln never opposed till it became a necessary tactic to ensure the rich Industrial North’s economic and regulatory hammerlock over the Agricultural South…

Regardless of your opinion on Civil Rights – which he trampled carelessly underfoot when he threw away the principle of habeus corpus (as well as the 1st, 4th, etc. amendments) when he authorized imprisonment without trial of over 18,000 dissenters for the sake of political expediency…

Regardless of the fact that he allowed a political discussion to degenerate into one of the bloodiest wars the planet has ever seen…

Regardless of the fact that he explicitly instructed General Sherman to have his soldiers specifically target civilians in the pursuit of his tyrannical prosecution of the war…

Regardless of all these crimes, the single most painful thrust of Lincoln’s bloody-pelvised aggravated rape of Lady Liberty was his destruction of the right of states to secede.

What kind of club or association can legally, ethically, or morally state that “Now that you have joined us, we pass a rule that you may never leave this voluntary association”?

When Lincoln told the states that they are forever and irrevocably the property of the federal government, he made slaves of us all.

Lincoln was in fact a tyrant and a brutal dictator of the worst sort, and in retrospect it is damned difficult to see John Wilkes Booth as anything other than a true American Hero.

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2 thoughts on “Abe Lincoln, the Greatest Slaver of them all

  1. Lincoln didn’t turn a political discussion into a war: the “Confederate” leaders who staged an illegal and criminal rebellion against the United States did. Or maybe you never noticed that Confederate troops attacked and seized U.S. forts long before Lincoln ever set foot in Washington?

    As for secession: everybody in the North, and about half the South, regarded secession as illegal, including Robert E. Lee. Lincoln’s bitter adversary, Sen. Stephen Douglas, told him his call for 75,000 troops to put down rebellion was a mistake – he should call for for _200,000_ troops. Hundreds of thousands of men politically opposed to Lincoln volunteered for the Union army.

    What kind of association has membership binding on its members? Just about _any_ contract is revocable only by mutual consent of all parties unless explicitly provided otherwise. Article VI states that laws made by Congress under the Constitution are “the law of the land… anything in the laws or constitution of any state notwithstanding.” That clause was in the Constitution from the beginning, and was accepted by every state that ratified and applied to every state admitted later.

    Lincoln swore a solemn oath to uphold the Constitution and laws of the United States. He fulfilled that oath.

    What other nonsense is here?

    The “industrial North”? The South was almost exclusively agricultural in 1860; but the rest of the country was predominantly rural too. The value of farms far exceeded the value of factories in every state except Massachusetts and Rhode Island: by 3.5-1 in Pennsylvania, the #1 manufacturing state, by 5-1 in NY, 10-1 in VT, 12-1 in OH, 15-1 in IL, 20-1 in IN.

  2. Rich: thanks for your comment. Interesting that this topic still commands such strong feelings.
    Your objections, however, are incorrect.

    Lincoln didn’t turn a political discussion into a war: the “Confederate” leaders who staged an illegal and criminal rebellion against the United States did. Or maybe you never noticed that Confederate troops attacked and seized U.S. forts long before Lincoln ever set foot in Washington?

    Chronology taken from Wikipedia
    here and
    here :
    Throughout the 1850s he denied that there would ever be a civil war, and his supporters repeatedly rejected claims that his election would incite secession.
    […]indeed, the [Republican] party did not even run a slate in most of the South.
    […]
    On November 6, 1860, Lincoln was elected as the 16th President of the United States

    The Confederacy was formed 2/4/1861
    At his inauguration on March 4, 1861, the German American Turners formed Lincoln’s bodyguard; and a sizable garrison of federal troops was also present, ready to protect the capital from Confederate invasion and local insurrection.
    Fort Sumpter was attacked in April 1861.
    Your chronology is simply wrong.
    And while the Copnfederacy fired the first shots, given Lincoln’s statements and clear intent this raid on Ft. Sumter can be understood as preemptive self-defense.

    As for secession: everybody in the North, and about half the South, regarded secession as illegal,

    That’s simply incorrect. Many noted constitutional scholars and jurists of the day (including Henry Cabot Lodge) felt that the right to leave the voluntary association of the Union was firmly ensconced in the Constitution, as can be seen here, here, and here (just for starters).
    Yeah, everyone in the North felt Abe was in the right. That must explain the riots, the Copperhead movement, the editorials Lincoln had publishers imprisoned for (Hello? 1st Amendment?)

    What other nonsense is here?

    The “industrial North”?

    The times were increasing industrial, and what industry there was was in the North.
    Would you have been satisfied had I phrased it as “the more industrial north” or the “rapidly increasingly Industrial North”?
    The point stands.

    None of your objections hold water.
    Lincoln was a tyrant and monster, no matter how uncomfortable that may make us in the modern day.

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